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TEACHER'S AIDE COURSES ONLINE

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support


Teacher's Aide Course - Teacher's Assistant Course


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is a highest level nationally recognised teacher's aide course in Australia. Teacher's aides at this level work in inclusive classrooms, special needs schools or in specialised areas such literacy and numeracy programs. Graduates of the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support often work with students with additional needs, disabilities, disorders and difficulties such as Autism, ADHD and Dyslexia. Depending on your location, teacher's aides are also known as teacher's assistants, education assistants (WA), learning support officers or LSOs (NSW), integration aides (Vic.) and SSOs or school support officers (SA).


1 in 2 Study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support With FTTA


This course is available by distance mode, class-based mode and recognition of prior learning for existing workers with experience. Distance mode is popular for learners with family, work or other commitments or for those who live in regional and rural areas. Class based mode is a great option for those who can make it to class at least once a week, giving students the benefits of both face to face contact and structured self-paced learning. All students are required to complete a work placement in a local school for a minimum of 100 hours.


The Go-To Provider for Teacher's Aide Courses in Australia


Fast Track Training Australia offer extensive student support, live webinars by industry experts, pre-recorded lectures, free face to face tutorials each week, 24/7 portal access, workplace visits for every student and real trainers who can be contacted by email or phone at any stage of your course. Dont be shy - speak to one of our friendly student advisers about the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support and get started with your new career today.


INCLUDED IN THE COURSE

SUBSIDISED FROM $50 (QLD)

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

INCLUDES ALL LEARNER GUIDES

NO ADDITIONAL OR HIDDEN FEES

CLASS, DISTANCE & RPL MODE

30 DAY NO-OBLIGATION PERIOD

LIVE & PRE-RECORDED WEBINARS

WORKPLACE VISITS FOR EVERY STUDENT

HARDCOPY CERTIFICATE

Course Details: CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

Qualification

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

Nationally recognised

Yes. This qualification is recognised in all states and territories of Australia.

Locations

Available in all locations including Perth WA, Brisbane QLD, Sydney NSW, Melbourne Victoria and Adelaide SA.

Distance mode

Supported, structured & self-paced mode for learners likely to be successful in an external program of study.

Class based mode

Perth - Cockburn and Brisbane CBD. Workshops are held one day per week for ten weeks plus ongoing support & live webinars - starting every school term. Workshops introduce learners to the main topics. Click here to view the class calendar. Note most students enrolled in class-based mode study the Teacher’s Aide Combo.

RPL

Recognition of prior learning is available for experienced workers seeking recognition of their existing skills and knowledge.

Duration

18 weeks full time equivalent

Enrolment period

Learners are initially provided with 12 months in order to complete their course.

Assessments

Short answer questions, workplace scenarios, workplace demonstration and workplace portfolio.

Placement

100 hours in a local school. All students are visited in the workplace by their trainer for support and guidance.

Topics

Topics include safety, duty of care, behaviour management, scaffolding, supervision, literacy, disabilities, child development and preparing resources.

Teacher’s aide jobs

Graduates may be employed as a teacher’s aide, teacher’s assistant, SSO or school support officer, integration aide, AIEO, education support worker, special needs education assistant, learning support officer or classroom assistant.

Certificate

On completion you will be issued an embossed hardcopy certificate with gold foil and presentation folder (including postage to an Australian address).

Nationally Recognised Training logo AQF logo Cert3G logo

Units of Competency - Click on any unit for additional information

CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work respectfully with people from diverse social and cultural groups and situations, including Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.


This unit applies to all workers.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety

The unit describes the skills and knowledge required to identify Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety issues in the workplace, model cultural safety in own work practice, and develop strategies to enhance cultural safety.


This unit applies to people working in a broad range of roles including those involved in direct client service, program planning, development and evaluation contexts.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCECE006 Support behaviour of children and young people

This unit describes the skills and knowledge to apply strategies to guide responsible behaviour of children and young people in a safe and supportive environment.


The unit applies to workers in a range of community service contexts.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS001 Comply with legislative, policy and industrial requirements in the education environment

This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to maintain compliance with legislation, policy and industrial instruments that relate to the education support worker role.


The unit applies to education support job roles in a variety of education contexts including schools and other educational settings.


This work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other educational professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS005 Support the development of literacy and oral language skills

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required in providing assistance to students who need additional support with their reading, writing and oral language skills.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS012 Set up and sustain individual and small group learning areas

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to establish and organise individual and/or small group learning environments, such as a home-based classroom, activity area in a classroom or library, or a virtual schooling area.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS021 Assist in facilitation of student learning

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to understand and apply a range of principles and processes to facilitate student learning, either for individuals or for small groups.


This unit applies to education support workers in a range of education environments who are responsible for aligning support strategies with teacher facilitation strategies to assist student learning.


This work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS022 Work with students in need of additional support

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required for education support workers to provide support to students who have to face a range of challenges that may limit their access to, participation in or outcomes from the curriculum.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


Education support workers will apply knowledge of appropriate educational responses as part of a team supporting students with learning difficulties.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS024 Use educational strategies to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander education

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to support, contribute to and coordinate education opportunities for students, including those from Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander backgrounds.


This unit applies to work undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


It addresses inclusion of community members in school activities, demonstration that everyone is valued in day-to-day interactions and support for students’ development of their self-concept.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS025 Facilitate learning for students with disabilities

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by education support workers to effectively contribute to learning experiences for students with a range of disabilities.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS032 Support learning and implementation of responsible behaviour

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to assist the individual and education organisation to implement responsible behaviour plans.


The unit develops an understanding of relevant legislation and organisation policies.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCPRP003 Reflect on and improve own professional practice

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to evaluate and enhance own practice through a process of reflection and ongoing professional development.


This unit applies to workers in all industry sectors who take pro-active responsibility for their own professional development.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCPRT001 Identify and respond to children and young people at risk

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to support and protect children and young people who are at risk of harm. This work occurs within legislative and policy frameworks and carries a duty of care responsibility.


This unit applies to workers in a range of job roles providing services to children and young people including in community services and health contexts.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

HLTWHS001 Participate in workplace health and safety

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required for workers to participate in safe work practices to ensure their own health and safety, and that of others.


The unit applies to all workers who require knowledge of workplace health and safety (WHS) to carry out their own work, either under direct supervision or with some individual responsibility.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS026 Deliver elements of teaching and learning programs

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by education support workers to deliver delegated structured learning activities to students.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS020 Support students' literacy learning

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by education support workers to work with teachers to support students in pre-primary, primary and secondary to develop literacy skills, including oral language, reading and writing skills.


The unit provides skills and knowledge to enable education support workers to work with the teacher to develop resources to reinforce literacy skills across the curriculum and to support students during various phases in the acquisition of literacy competence.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS023 Supervise students outside the classroom

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to supervise students in school grounds, community settings, and other non-classroom environments.


The unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

Minimum requirements

No previous qualifications or experience required.

Physical capability

Conduct learning activities with children including games inside and outside of the classroom.

IT resources

Access to a computer with an internet connection, desktop applications, PDF reader and other basics.

IT skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as opening PDFs and watching videos.

Numeracy skills

Candidates will need basic numeracy skills to count, add and subtract.

Language skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as reading and comprehending lesson plans.

Age

Be aged 16 years or over.

Clearances

Eligibility to obtain clearances such as Blue Card or WWCC.

Visas

FTTA are unable to enrol individuals on a student visa.

Standard enrolment - $2160 (QLD, WA, SA, Vic & NSW)

Payment Plans from $40 per week. Click here for details.

$100
QLD subsidised
$50
QLD concession
RPL QLD
$100 subsidised or $50 concession
Standard RPL - $1500

Payment Plans from $50 per week. Click here for details.

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$40 per week

54

$2160

Fortnightly

$80 per fortnight

27

$2160

Monthly

$180 per month

12

$2160

6 Payments

$360 per month

6

$2160

2 Payments

$1080 per month

2

$2160

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$50 per week

30

$1500

Fortnightly

$100 per fortnight

15

$1500

Monthly

$250 per month

6

$1500

5 Payments

$500 per month

3

$1500

2 Payments

$750 per month

2

$1500

Additional details and requirements

Additional fees may apply in some circumstances such as direct debit fees, overdue fees, re-assessment fees, replacement of resource fees and extension fees. See student handbook for further details.

Due to legislation, FTTA cannot accept more than $1500 in advance. Contact FTTA if you wish to pay your course fees sooner.

Refer also to the following for further information regarding fees and other pre-enrolment information:

  • Student Handbook
  • Direct Debit terms and conditions (found in the enrolment form)
  • Terms and conditions of enrolment (student Handbook)
  • Students are advised to carefully read information provided post enrolment including their itemised (unit by unit) invoice, acceptance letter, signed TnCs and course guide.
  • Program fact sheets (click here to read)

Who is eligible to receive QLD funded training?

To be eligible to enrol in the Certificate 3 Guarantee, prospective students must:

  • be aged 15 years or older;
  • be no longer at school (with the exception of school students in Years 10, 11 and 12 undertaking a VET in School (VETiS) program — see the VETiS fact sheet for more information);
  • permanently reside in Queensland;
  • be an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident (includes humanitarian entrant), temporary resident with the necessary visa and work permits on the pathway to permanent residency, or a New Zealand citizen; and
  • not hold, and not be enrolled in, a certificate III or higher-level qualification, not including qualifications completed at school and foundation skills training.

To be eligible for the Higher Level Skills program, individuals must:

  • be aged 15 years or over;
  • be no longer at school;
  • permanently reside in Queensland;
  • be an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident (includes humanitarian entrant), temporary resident with the necessary visa and work permits on the pathway to permanent residency, or a New Zealand citizen; and
  • not hold, and not be enrolled in, a certificate IV or higher-level qualification, not including qualifications completed at school and foundation skills training.

To be eligible for free training, Queensland Year 12 graduates must meet the above Certificate 3 Guarantee eligibility criteria and:

  • have evidence of completing Year 12 in Queensland, for example hold a Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority issued Senior Statement or equivalent certification;
  • enrol in a high priority qualification under the program with a PQS; and
  • commence training within 12 months of graduating Year 12 (i.e. by the end of the calendar year after completing Year 12).

Concessional student status (QLD) applies when:

  • The student meets the criteria for the co-contribution subsidised fee and
  • The student holds a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card issued under Commonwealth law, or is the partner or a dependant of a person who holds a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card and is named on the card or
  • The student provides FTTA with an official form under Commonwealth law confirming that the student, their partner or the person of whom the student is a dependant is entitled to concessions under a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card or
  • The student is an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or
  • The student is a school student and is enrolled in a VETiS program (may include young people in detention) or
  • The student has a disability

Students enrolling in a funded program (QLD) should be aware of the following:

  • The Certificate 3 Guarantee and Higher Level Skills program are funded by the Queensland Government.
  • The Departments program fact sheets can be found by clicking here or by visiting www.training.qld.gov.au.
  • Students are required to complete the Training and Employment Survey within three months of completing or discontinuing a subsidised qualification.
  • Students will no longer be eligible for a government subsidised training place under the Certificate 3 Guarantee once they complete a certificate level III qualification.
  • Students will no longer be eligible for a government subsidised training place under the Higher Level Skills program once they complete a certificate level IV or higher qualification.
  • Students should also familiarise themselves with FTTA’s policies including the refund policy and complaints policy and procedure found in the student handbook.
  • For QLD funded programs, the invoiced per unit fee, is calculated as the fee displayed, divided by the number of units required to be completed. This is $2.94 per unit for concessional enrolments and $5.88 for non-concessional enrolments. This fee structure may be amended for students enrolling in fewer than 17 units - speak to FTTA if this applies to you.
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CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

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1 in 2 study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with FTTA.

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

Interest free plans from $40, no hidden fees & all resources included.

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES

From $50 - courses subsidised by the Queensland government.

SUPPORT

Webinars & tutorials or contact your trainer for unlimited support.

PLACEMENT

We visit every learner in the workplace to provide support.

30 DAY NO-OBLIGATIONS

A 30-day no obligation period so you can be sure the course is for you.

MODES

Supported self-paced distance mode or class from 1 day per week.

WEEKLY WEBINARS

Attend weekly live webinars from the comfort of your own home.

ESTABLISHED PROVIDER

An established provider with more than 4000 happy graduates.

Ten FAQs for the

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

and detailed answers from our popular blogs

We answer the most common questions that we receive from students on a daily basis. Read about what teacher’s aides do a daily basis, the most effective way to find a teacher’s aide job, what you can expect when studying the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support online or class based, and a range of other common and relevant questions for those considering this challenging and rewarding career.


The questions and answers published below are selected from our popular blog articles which can be accessed in full by clicking here.


Summary of key points from our popular blogs:

  • Most schools employ dozens of teacher’s aides, many of whom work part time or casual. Some schools employ 30-40 or more teacher’s aides.
  • To maximise your chances of finding work, complete a nationally recognised qualification with a reputable provider such as the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support.
  • Typically speaking, it’s easy to find work on a casual or relief basis once you have completed the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support.
  • FTTA is geared towards supporting busy adult learners who need a structured and supported yet flexible courses. This allows students to study around other commitments such as family, work, medical issues and travel.
  • TAFE may be a good option for students under the age of 18. TAFE is effectively an extension of high school.
  • The work placement is for a minimum of 100 hours in a registered school – well-trained teacher’s aides often find work where they complete their placement
  • Even online students need support services such as live and interactive webinars, tutorials, easy phone contact and friendly accessible trainers.
  • Having trainers visit you in the workplace is key to your professional development and helps with finding work post placement.
  • Teacher’s aides in Australia are paid approximately $30 per hour and tend to work 32 hours per week. Most teacher’s aides are part time.
  • If you have raised children or have experience with any of the caring industries (child care, aged care, AOD) you may complete the course faster due to existing skills and knowledge (transferrable and generic skills).

What do teacher’s aides do?

teacher aide learning

Teacher’s aides work in schools supporting learning and assisting teachers. Pictured: FTTA student celebrates the last day of her placement.


Teacher’s aides work in schools assisting teachers and supporting children to learn and develop new skills. They also assist the teacher with administration tasks, behaviour management, planning and developing resources, and often work with students with disabilities and disorders one-on-one or in small groups (often called individualised support or direct instruction).


Teacher’s aides can work in a range of environments; their roles and responsibilities can therefore vary significantly (what is often referred to as ‘role-stretch’). For example, a teacher’s aide who works in year 1 will do a very different job to a teacher’s aide who works in year 12 – or someone who works with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) in a special needs (education support) school.


There are three common tasks that all teacher’s aides are employed to undertake:

  • Assist with student behaviour
  • Assist with student development and learning
  • Assist with operational or logistical tasks

In a typical classroom, the teacher’s aide will circulate from group to group or work one on one with a particular student. He or she is not expected to teach the whole class as that is the role of the classroom teacher. During class time, the teacher’s aide is helping to ensure that students are meeting behavioural expectations and are on-task.


The term ‘on task’ means that students are doing what they are supposed to be doing – normally learning something, completing an activity or task set by the teacher (and not socialising too much as many would prefer to do).


Teacher’s aides work collaboratively with teachers, developing and obtaining resources, setting up and operating equipment, undertaking administrative and logistical duties, supervising and monitoring students and participating in teaching activities under the direction of the classroom teacher. They provide a wide range of individualised and group supports for students who need assistance in order to access learning and development activities.


Let’s have a quick review of what teacher’s aides do, according to some recent studies in Australia and internationally:


A Queensland study in 2015 showed that many teacher’s aides work one to one with students or in small groups. A 2015 study from the Australian Association for Research in Education showed that teacher’s aides commonly focus on improving student learning and development particularly in core subjects such as literacy and numeracy.


A 2018 study from the ACT explained the importance of teacher’s aides in supporting special needs students. Howard and Ford (2007) noted that teacher’s aide were tasked with ‘planning, producing and adapting materials.’ Another study discussed the importance of teacher’s aide in support student learning in a developmental curriculum.

Where can a teacher’s aides be employed?

Education in Australia is compulsory until a certain age depending on the state. Some states require attendance until at least the year in which the child turns 17 (through formal schooling or a combination of training and employment). Compulsory school education in Australia generally begins with preschool. Students then enrol in primary school (grade k-6), followed by secondary school (or high school, grade 7-10) and senior secondary school (or college, grade 11 and 12). There are various versions of this system in each state, territory or region.


Schools in Australia are either government or non-government. Non-government schools include private schools, faith-based schools and alternative schools such as Montessori. All schools in Australia are predominantly publicly funded by the state and federal governments.

teacher assistant planning a learning activity

Teacher’s aides can be employed in a range of different schools including primary and high schools, special needs and specialist programs.


The details below may differ depending on your location. Information has been generalised in some cases.


Kindergarten

Often shortened to Kindy – attended by children around 4 years of age. Kindergarten is not compulsory however it is very common for parents to enrol their children in kindy when they are old enough. Kindy programs are not always operated by schools and many childcare services offer kindy programs. Some teacher’s aides work in kindy programs especially those operated by schools. The purpose of kindy is to:

  • Learn through play in a structured learning environment
  • Learn how to make friends, share and develop social skills
  • Develop basic knowledge and expand on language skills
  • Learn how to express ideas and thoughts through art, dance and play
  • Help with the transition from home to formal full-time school

Pre-primary

Pre-primary is the first year of formal schooling and starts at around 5 years of age. Pre-primary is full-time and is compulsory in some states such as Western Australia. You can think of pre-primary as halfway between kindy and primary school. Pre-primary is operated and delivered by early childhood teachers employed by a primary school in conjunction with teacher’s aides who assist with logistical activities such as setting up resources and light cleaning.

Primary school

Primary school begins after pre-primary and operates from year 1 until year 6 or 7 depending on your location. This is the first stage of compulsory schooling in Australia. Many teacher’s aides work in primary schools. Primary schools commonly include:

  • A structured learning environment with a qualified teacher in each class
  • Attendance is required Monday-Friday and for 3 or 4 terms
  • Learning follows the key areas and concepts outlined in the curriculum
  • Student begin to learn specialised knowledge such as foreign languages

High School

High school, also known as secondary school or college, covers the years 7-12. Many teacher’s aides are employed in high schools. High schools are distinguishable to primary schools in the following ways:

  • Teachers are specialists in learning areas such as maths or science
  • Students generally move from class to class several times a day
  • Students can choose elective subjects such as Outdoor Education

Special needs

Students with learning difficulties or disabilities have an equal opportunity to an education under law. Generally speaking, parents can choose:

  • To have their child mainstreamed, meaning the child will attend a mainstream school with the additional support of a teacher’s aide for some or all of the day.
  • To send their child to a special needs school with funding and facilities that specialise in the delivery of education to students with additional needs. Special needs schools employ large numbers of teacher’s aides.

What is the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support?

teacher assistant planning a learning activity

The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is the highest-level qualification for working as a teacher’s aide. Pictured: FTTA student on placement.


Put quite simply, the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is the highest-level teacher’s aide qualification available in Australia. It is one step up from the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is known in the industry as the required course to be employed as a special needs teacher's aide. Special needs teacher's aides can also be called integration aides in Victoria, school support officers, or SSOs, in South Australia, learning support officers in NSW, Teacher’s aides, or a range of other terms depending on the state.


Many people who work in special needs schools (as a teacher’s aide) hold this qualification. Special needs schools (often called education support centres) are schools that are designed specifically for students with complex additional needs such as Autism, Down syndrome, and students with multiple disabilities and disorders or complex needs requiring the support of dedicated teacher’s aides.


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support, covers all the basics of working as a teacher’s aide similar to the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support with a greater emphasis on working with special needs students.


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support also focuses on the strategies, systems, processes, policies, techniques, floor craft, and other relevant pedagogical techniques, required to work with students that need one on one and small group support from a highly trained special needs teacher’s aide.

What is the difference between the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support and the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

As we have discussed earlier, the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is for students who wish to work with special needs, or for those simply want to hold the highest qualification available to teacher’s aides in Australia. This gives you the maximum chance of finding work including being offered a contract and becoming a permanent teacher’s aide in a school. It also gives you the confidence of knowing that you have completed the advanced qualification covering topics such as disabilities and complex needs.


While the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is predominantly for working in special needs, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support only touches on special needs. The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is a broad-based qualification that covers a range of topics for non-disabled students such as literacy, numeracy, behaviour management and safety. It is important to remember however that all of the things that you will learn in the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support are applicable to students with a disability and there is a significant overlap between the two courses.


For example, one of the strategies that you will learn in both courses is scaffolding. Scaffolding basically means that difficult or complex tasks are divided into smaller tasks and learnt one little piece at a time. Once a task has been achieved, a slightly more complex task is then tackled. This is a common strategy taught in universities to teachers around the world.

This important strategy is applicable when working with students with disabilities as well as with non-disabled students. In the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support, students learn how to apply this particular strategy while working with students with complex needs, in both mainstream and special needs schools.


Another difference is the cost. Unless the course is government funded, typically the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is slightly more expensive. One of the reasons for this, is that very few training providers (including TAFEs) deliver the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. It is a highly specialised niche qualification that requires specialised trainers and curriculum. While the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support may be slightly more expensive, it is definitely worth the extra expense in our opinion. The benefits certainly outweigh the small extra cost.


We recommend the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support, or the Teacher's Aide Combo in order to maximise your job prospects and the opportunity to work in any support role in a school. The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support may be more suitable for those who have never studied before, have no experience with children, have recently left high school, English is their second language, or for those who have a learning disability or disorder. Speak with your provider about your situation for the best advice.

Is the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support the best way to become a teacher's aide in Australia?

teacher assistant planning a learning activity

Many students find work where they complete their placement. Pictured: FTTA student celebrates completing her course.

This qualification is the most effective, efficient, and easiest way to become a special needs teacher's aide. Special needs teacher’s aides typically hold this qualification. If you're applying for a job to become a special needs teacher’s aide, you will be expected to hold this qualification.


Sometimes you can work as a special needs teacher’s aide if you don't hold this qualification. This can happen in rare instances such as if you have an overseas teaching qualification that is not recognised in Australia, or you have a child care qualification. However, even in these instances, we still recommend that staff hold the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support especially if you plan on working in this sector for any period of time.


About 10 years ago, the majority of special needs teacher’s aides did not hold this or any other qualification. However, these days, schools need to know that all of their staff have the necessary skills and knowledge to meet the needs of students with complex behavioural and learning needs. For example, untrained teacher’s aides will give students the answer to a question nearly 7x more often than a person who is a trained educator – why? The reason is that trained educators (at least those who have completed a course with a good provider) know that task completion is not the goal – conceptual understanding is much more important.

Are there different types of teacher’s aides in Australia?


There are many different types of teacher’s aides as they can undertake a range of different activities, roles and responsibilities within a school. For example, if you are working in a year 3 class with a student that has been diagnosed as ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) you will be undertaking tasks such as assisting with social interactions and literacy learning. In broad terms, literacy learning can best be described as helping a student learn how to read, write, spell, use grammar and sound out words – commonly known as phonics.


If, however, you are working in home economics you will take on a range of tasks such as conducting stocktakes and helping students with cooking and cleaning. Some teacher’s aides also work in the school library. They may also work in specific and specialist programs such as with disadvantaged students, sport, music, art or alternative programs in years’ 11 and 12.


The majority of teacher’s aides work with special needs students. Some schools also have special needs centres/school. A special needs centre or a special needs school is a school that specialises in supporting students with disabilities who generally require one on one and ongoing support. Quite often these schools have many more teacher’s aides than teachers and hence are a good place to start when looking for work early in your career. Note that special needs schools are often also called education support centres.

How much do teacher’s aides get paid in Australia?

Teacher’s aides are paid approximately $1000 a week or $30 an hour. You may be thinking $30 x 38 hours is not $1000. This is because most Teacher’s aides are employed for approximately 32.5 hours per week. This is the case because Teacher’s aides start at approximately 8:00 or 8:30 in the morning and finish at approximately 3:00, 3:15 or 3:30 in the afternoon.


This depends on the school and what they would prefer you to do. Some schools are happy for you to leave work almost straight after the bell whereas others set a time. You shouldn’t be rushing out the door at the same time as students as this doesn’t look that good professionally speaking.


Some online sources indicate that teacher’s aides are paid significantly less on average than our estimate. We believe that this information is incorrect because the majority of teacher’s aides work in special needs schools or with special needs students. In fact, probably around 75% - 85% of teacher’s aides work with special needs to some extent. This therefore means that most (the average) is closer to the top of pay scale which ranges from $24 to $35.


In almost all states of Australia, teacher’s aides are paid on a tiered scale. The first level is quite often for teacher’s aides working in mainstream. This mainly means assisting in lower levels classrooms such as year 1. The next tier is for teacher’s aides who work with special needs in mainstream (often referred to as an inclusive classroom). The top level is for teacher’s aides who work with students in special needs schools and they are typically paid the most.


Some staff may earn additional allowances or be employed in higher paying positions for various reasons. If you are working in a regional or rural area for example, you will be paid an additional allowance. All (except causal) staff receive leave entitlements such as personal leave and annual leave.

How do I become a teacher’s aide in Australia?

teacher assistant planning a learning activity

The first step to becoming a teacher’s aide is to complete a qualification such as the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. Pictured: FTTA graduate in front of display of student work.


To become a teachers’ aide in Australia, there are a range of steps that you need to follow including completing a course such as the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with a reputable provider, obtaining clearances and applying at a dozen or more schools. Below we have listed several key steps that we believe is the tried and tested method for becoming a teacher’s aide in Australia. It’s also worth noting that not all students follow this process, however experience has taught us that this method is very effective.


If you know anyone currently employed in a school (teachers, principals, deputies, school mangers, integration aides or teachers’ aides), ask them whether any positions are available (now or in the future), if they are willing to write you a letter of recommendation, and who you should speak to in order to apply and submit your resume.


Here are the steps that we recommend in order to become a teacher’s aide in Australia:


Step 1. Obtain a nationally recognised qualification through a reputable provider. Schools need to know that you’ve learnt everything that is required in order to keep students safe and to maximise their learning potential. Well-trained graduates tend to find work where they complete their placement.


Step 2. Prepare your resume, clearances and introduction letter. Note that we have a resume and intro letter template builder on our website available for free. Your resume should be simple, clear and professional.


Hint: Think about the job-hunting process as if it were your actual job. It takes time and persistence.


Step 3. Approach a range of schools in your area and ask to be put down on their relief list. There will normally be someone at the front office in charge of managing and coordinating relief work.


Many schools tell us that they can’t find enough relief staff - especially special needs schools and high schools. Don’t forget to consider special needs schools which are schools within a school in many cases – also called education support centres. You will also be paid slightly more to work in special needs schools (generally).


Step 4. Be persistent. Continue asking on a regular basis (within reason) and keep applying for jobs as they come up. Always dress professionally – call and drop in now and then (try not to use email).


Sometimes people are lucky and walk straight into a dream position however that is rare. Most of the time, you will need to put in the hard yards. Once you get a shot in a school, do the best you can, ask for feedback and put all the skills and knowledge that you have learnt in your course into action. At the end of the day, ask the teacher how you went and show them that you are eager to improve.


Once you have completed a few days of relief work at a school, you will probably be called in more and more, and eventually be offered a contract. Schools tend to use one main person for relief especially if they know that person is reliable and well-trained. If a contract or permanent position is what you are chasing, this pathway is very effective – if you have been employed as relief throughout the year, you will often get first option at contracts as they become available. Schools will reward your loyalty and prefer to hire people that they know. In fact, if you are exceptionally good at your job, there is a chance a position will be created for you – one reason why enrolling with a reputable provider pays off!

What are the main components of the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support?

teacher assistant planning a learning activity

FTTA students tend to be adult learners who require flexible study options that fit around other life commitments. Pictured: FTTA students in class studying the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support.


There are effectively three parts to the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. The learning part is probably the longest and most time-consuming part of your course. Learner materials include:

  • Webinars either live or pre-recorded
  • Classroom lectures (recorded) or actual classes
  • Tutorials and regular contact with your trainer
  • Reading the learner guide and completing activities
  • Research and other activities set by your trainer

The second part of your course are the theory assessments. The theory assessments are often not as hard as many think, yet they do cause some stress amongst students (until they have completed the first assessment, at which point most realise they are very ‘do-able’). All of our assessments focus on your work as a teacher’s aide in a typical mainstream or special needs school.


The final part of your course is your work placement. This critical requirement is completed by all students who undertake either the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. The work placement is for a minimum of 100 hours and is usually completed in a local school.


We are often asked if students can complete the placement in a school where their children are currently attending. That is perfectly fine provided the school agrees and you are not working in the same class as your child.


The structure of your course also depends on your chosen provider. To enrol in a teacher’s aide course in Australia, and in particular the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support, there are two main options available for your consideration.


If you are an adult learner, enrolling with a provider such as FTTA is probably the most suitable option. FTTA is geared towards supporting busy adult learners who need a structured, supported and flexible course. This allows students to study around other commitments such as family, work, medical issues and travel. This is also why the average age of our students is 37. Statistically, the majority of adult learners enrol with private providers.


TAFE may be a good option for students under the age of 18 or who are still at school. It is also ideal for students who struggle with English and need ongoing support and guidance that may only be possible by attending class 4-5 days per week. The TAFE system is typically known as the provider for younger students or for people in rural areas.

Summary

FTTA have published a range of informative and detailed articles – a sample from which has been displayed above. You have read about the best way to become a teacher’s aide, how much you can expect to earn, the types of jobs available for teacher’s aides and all about the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. We encourage you to read more of our articles or contact FTTA for any questions that you may have regarding the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support – the highest-level teacher’s aide course available in Australia.

VIDEOS

OUR MOST WATCHED VIDEOS

STUDY BY DISTANCE MODE

Transcript

STUDY BY CLASS MODE

Transcript

TEACHER'S AIDE GUIDE

Transcript

Distance

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Many students prefer to study their course without coming into class on a regular basis. This is commonly referred to as distance learning but can also be called external, online, blended or flexible learning. These terms are very similar and generally mean that:

  • There is little or no attendance on campus
  • Most learning materials are accessed through a website portal
  • Students will often have hardcopy materials as well
  • Students will still have access to support via email and phone
  • Many students still attend tutorials for additional assistance

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. There are many reasons why students choose to study by distance:

  • Classes are not held in the local area
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning classes cover existing knowledge
  • Alternative study programs or pathways
  • Regular travel or hospital stays
  • Existing worker completing a traineeships or RPL

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are not attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Online learning is becoming more and more popular each year and many courses now enrol more online students than class based students.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at ftta.com.au

Class Based Learning

Class based learning is a popular study mode and is great for students who have not studied for a long period of time, who live closer to the training location or who simply enjoy being in class. We always recommend enrolling in a class based mode where possible as students who attend classes are typically more successful.

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in a classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. Class based learning with FTTA involves the following:

  • Attend class one day per week over a period of time
  • Complete set homework activities and assessments between classes
  • Attend tutorial as needed and recommended by your trainer
  • Complete the workplace learning component
  • Regularly accessing resources and learning materials in the online portal
  • Regular contact with trainers via email, phone, individual meetings/tutorials or during class

Students tell us that they enjoy being in class for two main reasons:
Firstly, because they can easily ask questions and trainers can help students when stuck. Note that many courses have online lectures (recorded in class) for distance students.

Secondly, students enjoy the social aspect of class based learning: swapping stories, talking about the course and helping each other along the way. Many students make new friends and study together outside of class time.

There are many reasons why students choose a flexible class based study mode:

  • Attending full time is not possible
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning extensive class time is not an efficient use of time
  • Enrolled in other education programs
  • Regular travel or hospital stays

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner as directed by their trainer. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Flexible learning is becoming more and more popular as people become busier.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at ftta.com.au

Education Support - A Guide

Education Assistants work in schools such as kindergartens, primary schools, high schools and special needs centres.

Education Assistants work under the guidance and instruction of teachers. They can work with a single student for most of the day or float in a class or a number of classes helping many different students.

Education Assistants or EAs for short can also be called integration aides, teacher aides, support workers, teacher assistants, Aboriginal and Indigenous Education Officers or AIEOs, Home Economic Assistants, or school support officers.

Some of the main tasks of an EA includes:

  • Helping individual students with activities and learning
  • Helping small groups of students with activities and learning
  • Helping students with core skills such as reading, writing and numeracy
  • Helping students who have learning difficulties, a disability or a disorder
  • Helping the teacher with behaviour management, ensuring that students are on task
  • Helping the teacher with activities such as cleaning and preparing resources
  • Ensuring that students are safe at all times

Education Assistants are most often employed to work with students who need additional support in learning or due to a disability or behavioural issues.

EAs may also work in specialist positions such as in literacy programs or youth at risk programs.

To obtain work as an EA you will need to have the following:

  • A Working with Children Check
  • Usually a police clearance is also required
  • A relevant qualification such as the Certificate III in Disability or Certificate III in Education Support
  • A suitable demeanour, attitude and presentation to work in a school environment
  • A love of working with children and other people in a team environment
  • A good quality resume and cover letter

Education Assistants undertake many community service work tasks including but not limited to:

  • Working with parents and guardians on a daily basis
  • Assisting with case management (IEPs and IBPs)
  • Organising community events such as excursions and fetes
  • Assisting vulnerable groups of people such as low-socio economic
  • Ensuring abuse and neglect is reported to supervisors
  • Obtaining funding such as grants from government departments or local businesses
  • Organising and assisting with events such as art displays
  • Working with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Assisting with a range of disabilities and disorders
  • Researching and informing clients of support services and networks
  • Liaising with community groups
  • Liaising with specialist case workers such as psychologists and teachers
  • Managing behaviour and learning
  • Planning activities and creating resources

Education assistants often work with children with disabilities including but not limited to:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Dyslexia
  • Processing disorders
  • Developmental delay disorders
  • Foetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Oppositional Defiance Disorder
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Mental health
  • Fragile X
  • Downs Syndrome

It is generally easy to find casual and part time work as an education assistant by putting your name down at all schools in your local area. This often leads to more permanent employment. Many education assistants work part time.

When looking for work, don’t forget special needs schools which are schools within the main school that even have their own Principal, teachers and administration staff. Over 90% of people who enrol in a course to become an education assistant are female and are often mothers who are looking for family friendly work hours.

Depending on the course and level, education assistants learn the following:

  • Safety including duty of care laws
  • Education policy and regulations
  • Supporting students literacy and numeracy learning
  • Instructional techniques (how to help students learn)
  • Techniques for working with a diverse range of people
  • Behaviour management techniques
  • Developmental domains such as cognitive, language and social development
  • Basics of and techniques for working with specific disabilities and disorders
  • Creating activities and basic planning
  • Working with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individual Behaviour Plans (IBPs)
  • Early Years Learning Framework implementation

Working in the education sector is challenging, rewarding and is a never ending learning curve. Rarely will you be bored working as an education assistant as each day presents a new challenge.

If you would like more information, please speak to one of our student advisors.

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OUR TEACHER'S AIDE COURSES

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

TEACHER'S AIDE COURSE

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TEACHER'S AIDE COURSE

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

Enrol in the highest level teacher's aide course and maximise your job prospects.

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FROM OUR STUDENTS

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Thanks to my trainer and FTTA, I know made the right decision to change my career.

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With more than 4000 graduates, FTTA is the go-to provider for teacher's aide courses. 1 in 2 students choose to study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with FTTA.

              

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