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TEACHER'S AIDE COURSES ONLINE

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support


Teacher's Aide Course - Teacher's Assistant Course


The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the entry level teacher's aide course that covers all the basics of working as a teacher's aide. Teacher's aides are employed by schools to support students and the classroom teacher. They work with students one-on-one or in small groups and often work closely with students with additional needs. They are often focused on supporting students' literacy and numeracy development as well as assisting the teacher with administration and preparation tasks. Teacher's aides are also known as teacher's assistants, education assistants, integration aides, SSOs or school support officers. The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the minimum qualification required to work as a teacher's aide in Australia.


Australia's Go-To Provider for Teacher's Aide Courses


Learners who undertake the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support by distance or class-based mode complete a series of theory assessments as well as a placement in a local school. Learners have 24/7 access to their portal to watch videos, lectures, webinars, complete activities and submit assessments. Learners undertake a structured & supported self-paced learning program with regular contact from their experienced and friendly allocated trainer. Trainers regularly hold workshops, tutorials, live webinars and students can even book one-on-one meetings.


Established Provider - More Than 4000 Graduates


With more than 4000 graduates, government subsidised courses from $50, an 87% completion rate, payment plans and no additional or hidden fees, FTTA has long been the go-to provider for teacher's aide courses in Brisbane QLD, Perth WA, Adelaide SA, Melbourne Victoria and Sydney NSW. Speak to one of our friendly student advisers today about your career aspirations and begin your new journey.

INCLUDED IN THE COURSE

SUBSIDISED FROM $50 (QLD)

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

INCLUDES ALL LEARNER GUIDES

NO ADDITIONAL OR HIDDEN FEES

CLASS, DISTANCE & RPL MODE

30 DAY NO-OBLIGATION PERIOD

LIVE & PRE-RECORDED WEBINARS

WORKPLACE VISITS FOR EVERY STUDENT

HARDCOPY CERTIFICATE

Course Details: CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Qualification

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

Nationally recognised

Yes. This qualification is recognised in all states and territories of Australia.

Locations

Available in all locations including Perth WA, Brisbane QLD, Sydney NSW, Melbourne Victoria and Adelaide SA.

Distance mode

Supported, structured & self-paced mode for learners likely to be successful in an external program of study.

Class based mode

Available every school term in Brisbane and Perth for CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support or the Teacher’s Aide Combo. Click here to view the class calendar. Note most students enrolled in class-based mode study the Teacher’s Aide Combo.

RPL

Recognition of prior learning is available for experienced workers seeking recognition of their existing skills and knowledge.

Duration

26 weeks

Enrolment period

Learners are initially provided with 12 months in order to complete their course.

Assessments

Short answer questions, workplace scenarios, workplace demonstration and workplace portfolio.

Work placement

100 hours in a local school. All students are visited in the workplace by their trainer for support and guidance.

Topics

Topics include safety, duty of care, behaviour management, scaffolding, supervision, literacy, disabilities, child development & preparing resources.

Teacher’s aide jobs

Graduates may be employed as a teacher’s aide, teacher’s assistant, SSO or school support officer, integration aide, AIEO, education support worker, special needs education assistant, learning support officer or classroom assistant.

Certificate

On completion you will be issued an embossed hardcopy certificate with gold foil and presentation folder (including postage to an Australian address).

Nationally Recognised Training logo AQF logo Cert3G logo

Units of Competency - Click on any unit for additional information

CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety CHCECE006 Support behaviour of children and young people CHCEDS001 Comply with legislative, policy and industrial requirements in the education environment CHCEDS002 Assist in implementation of planned educational programs CHCEDS003 Contribute to student education in all developmental domains CHCEDS004 Contribute to organisation and management of classroom or centre CHCEDS005 Support the development of literacy and oral language skills CHCEDS006 Support the development of numeracy skills CHCEDS007 Work effectively with students and colleagues CHCEDS008 Comply with school administrative requirements CHCEDS012 Set up and sustain individual and small group learning areas CHCEDS017 Contribute to the health and safety of students CHCEDS018 Support students with additional needs in the classroom environment CHCEDS021 Assist in facilitation of student learning CHCEDS026 Deliver elements of teaching and learning programs HLTWHS001 Participate in workplace health and safety

CHCDIV001 Work with diverse people

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work respectfully with people from diverse social and cultural groups and situations, including Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.


This unit applies to all workers.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCDIV002 Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety

The unit describes the skills and knowledge required to identify Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety issues in the workplace, model cultural safety in own work practice, and develop strategies to enhance cultural safety.


This unit applies to people working in a broad range of roles including those involved in direct client service, program planning, development and evaluation contexts.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCECE006 Support behaviour of children and young people

This unit describes the skills and knowledge to apply strategies to guide responsible behaviour of children and young people in a safe and supportive environment.


The unit applies to workers in a range of community service contexts.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS002 Assist in implementation of planned educational programs

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to assist a worker to support the teacher/s in delivering planned education programs. Classroom-level support is provided to ensure the learning environment is inclusive and relevant, and appropriately resourced and maintained.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS003 Contribute to student education in all developmental domains

This unit describes the knowledge and skills required to support students with different developmental issues to participate in classroom and other school activities.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS004 Contribute to organisation and management of classroom or centre

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to support the effective functioning of a classroom or other learning environment. It deals with practical issues such as administration, equipment, teaching aids and other supplies.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS005 Support the development of literacy and oral language skills

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required in providing assistance to students who need additional support with their reading, writing and oral language skills.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS006 Support the development of numeracy skills

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to implement numeracy programs as identified by the teacher to assist students requiring additional numeracy support.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS007 Work effectively with students and colleagues

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to effectively communicate with students and colleagues.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS017 Contribute to the health and safety of students

This unit describes skills and knowledge required for teacher assistants to contribute effectively to the health and safety of students. The education support worker implements workplace health and safety instructions and procedures within his or her scope of responsibility and according to direction.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS018 Support students with additional needs in the classroom environment

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by an education support worker to support students with additional needs in classrooms where there are students with a mix of abilities and needs.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

HLTWHS001 Participate in workplace health and safety

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required for workers to participate in safe work practices to ensure their own health and safety, and that of others.


The unit applies to all workers who require knowledge of workplace health and safety (WHS) to carry out their own work, either under direct supervision or with some individual responsibility.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS008 Comply with school administrative requirements

This unit describes the skills and knowledge for education support workers to undertake administration and basic computer tasks in the education environment where administration is not the main focus of work.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS012 Set up and sustain individual and small group learning areas

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to establish and organise individual and/or small group learning environments, such as a home-based classroom, activity area in a classroom or library, or a virtual schooling area.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS021 Assist in facilitation of student learning

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to understand and apply a range of principles and processes to facilitate student learning, either for individuals or for small groups.


This unit applies to education support workers in a range of education environments who are responsible for aligning support strategies with teacher facilitation strategies to assist student learning.


This work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS026 Deliver elements of teaching and learning programs

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required by education support workers to deliver delegated structured learning activities to students.


This unit applies to education support work in a variety of contexts and the work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other education professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

CHCEDS001 Comply with legislative, policy and industrial requirements in the education environment

This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to maintain compliance with legislation, policy and industrial instruments that relate to the education support worker role.


The unit applies to education support job roles in a variety of education contexts including schools and other educational settings.


This work is to be undertaken with appropriate guidance, support and supervision by a nominated teacher or other educational professional.


The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

Minimum requirements

No previous qualifications or experience required.

Physical capability

Conduct learning activities with children including games inside and outside of the classroom.

IT resources

Access to a computer with an internet connection, desktop applications, PDF reader and other basics.

IT skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as opening PDFs and watching videos.

Numeracy skills

Candidates will need basic numeracy skills to count, add and subtract.

Language skills

Ability to complete basic tasks such as reading and comprehending lesson plans.

Age

Be aged 16 years or over.

Clearances

Eligibility to obtain clearances such as Blue Card or WWCC.

Visas

FTTA are unable to enrol individuals on a student visa.

Standard enrolment - $1920 (QLD, WA, SA, Vic & NSW)

Payment plans from $40 per week. Click here for details.

$100
QLD subsidised non-concessional co-contribution fee
$50
QLD subsidised concessional co-contribution fee
$0
QLD subsidised Yr. 12 graduate co-contribution fee
RPL QLD subsidised
Co-contribution fee $50 concessional, $100 non-concessional.
Standard RPL - $1500

Payment plans from $50 per week. Click here for details.

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$40 per week

48

$1920

Fortnightly

$80 per fortnight

24

$1920

Monthly

$160 per month

12

$1920

6 Payments

$320 per month

6

$1920

2 Payments

$960 per month

2

$1920

Frequency

Per Payment

# Payments

Total Cost

Weekly

$50 per week

30

$1500

Fortnightly

$100 per fortnight

15

$1500

Monthly

$250 per month

6

$1500

5 Payments

$500 per month

3

$1500

2 Payments

$750 per month

2

$1500

Additional details and requirements

Additional fees may apply in some circumstances such as direct debit fees, overdue fees, re-assessment fees, replacement of resource fees and extension fees. See student handbook for further details.

Due to legislation, FTTA cannot accept more than $1500 in advance. Contact FTTA if you wish to pay your course fees sooner.

Refer also to the following for further information regarding fees and other pre-enrolment information:

  • Student Handbook
  • Direct Debit terms and conditions (found in the enrolment form)
  • Terms and conditions of enrolment (student Handbook)
  • Students are advised to carefully read information provided post enrolment including their itemised (unit by unit) invoice, acceptance letter, signed TnCs and course guide.
  • Program fact sheets (click here to read)

Who is eligible to receive QLD funded training?

To be eligible to enrol in the Certificate 3 Guarantee, prospective students must:

  • be aged 15 years or older;
  • be no longer at school (with the exception of school students in Years 10, 11 and 12 undertaking a VET in School (VETiS) program — see the VETiS fact sheet for more information);
  • permanently reside in Queensland;
  • be an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident (includes humanitarian entrant), temporary resident with the necessary visa and work permits on the pathway to permanent residency, or a New Zealand citizen; and
  • not hold, and not be enrolled in, a certificate III or higher-level qualification, not including qualifications completed at school and foundation skills training.

To be eligible for the Higher Level Skills program, individuals must:

  • be aged 15 years or over;
  • be no longer at school;
  • permanently reside in Queensland;
  • be an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident (includes humanitarian entrant), temporary resident with the necessary visa and work permits on the pathway to permanent residency, or a New Zealand citizen; and
  • not hold, and not be enrolled in, a certificate IV or higher-level qualification, not including qualifications completed at school and foundation skills training.

To be eligible for free training, Queensland Year 12 graduates must meet the above Certificate 3 Guarantee eligibility criteria and:

  • have evidence of completing Year 12 in Queensland, for example hold a Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority issued Senior Statement or equivalent certification;
  • enrol in a high priority qualification under the program with a PQS; and
  • commence training within 12 months of graduating Year 12 (i.e. by the end of the calendar year after completing Year 12).

Concessional student status (QLD) applies when:

  • The student meets the criteria for the co-contribution subsidised fee and
  • The student holds a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card issued under Commonwealth law, or is the partner or a dependant of a person who holds a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card and is named on the card or
  • The student provides FTTA with an official form under Commonwealth law confirming that the student, their partner or the person of whom the student is a dependant is entitled to concessions under a Health Care or Pensioner Concession Card or
  • The student is an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or
  • The student is a school student and is enrolled in a VETiS program (may include young people in detention) or
  • The student has a disability

Students enrolling in a funded program (QLD) should be aware of the following:

  • The Certificate 3 Guarantee and Higher Level Skills program are funded by the Queensland Government.
  • The Departments program fact sheets can be found by clicking here or by visiting www.training.qld.gov.au.
  • Students are required to complete the Training and Employment Survey within three months of completing or discontinuing a subsidised qualification.
  • Students will no longer be eligible for a government subsidised training place under the Certificate 3 Guarantee once they complete a certificate level III qualification.
  • Students will no longer be eligible for a government subsidised training place under the Higher Level Skills program once they complete a certificate level IV or higher qualification.
  • Students should also familiarise themselves with FTTA’s policies including the refund policy and complaints policy and procedure found in the student handbook.
  • For QLD funded programs, the invoiced per unit fee, is calculated as the fee displayed, divided by the number of units required to be completed. This is $2.94 per unit for concessional enrolments and $5.88 for non-concessional enrolments. This fee structure may be amended for students enrolling in fewer than 17 units - speak to FTTA if this applies to you.
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THE GO-TO PROVIDER FOR TEACHER'S AIDE COURSES

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

1 IN 2 CHOOSE FTTA

1 in 2 study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with FTTA.

PAYMENT PLANS FROM $40

Interest free plans from $40, no hidden fees & all resources included.

GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES

From $50 - courses subsidised by the Queensland government.

SUPPORT

Webinars & tutorials or contact your trainer for unlimited support.

PLACEMENT

We visit every learner in the workplace to provide support.

30 DAY NO-OBLIGATIONS

A 30-day no obligation period so you can be sure the course is for you.

MODES

Supported self-paced distance mode or class from 1 day per week.

RESEARCH BASED CONTENT

Course content based on the latest research, trends and strategies.

ESTABLISHED PROVIDER

An established provider with more than 4000 happy graduates.

Ten FAQs for the

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

and detailed answers from our popular blogs

Read some of the most common questions we receive each day about the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. Learn about how much teacher’s aide are paid, what teacher’s aide do each day, how to find a teacher’s aide job, how to become a teacher’s aide, all about studying online and a range of other important questions and answers relevant to your future profession as a teacher’s aide.


The questions and answers below have been selected from our extensive collection of articles which are freely available on our blog accessible here.


Summary of key points:

  • Teacher’s aides are involved in almost all facets of school life, including instructions design and delivery, behaviour management, classroom management and resource development.
  • Distance or online study is particularly useful for busy people who need flexible study arrangements that work around other commitments such as family.
  • Classes provide the added benefits of face to face contact, social interactions, structure and routine.
  • Schools tend to only hire qualified teacher’s aides, as they need to ensure that all staff can utilise the best strategies and techniques to adequately support a range of complex needs.
  • It’s important to bear in mind that ‘online’ is a broad term that can mean many different things – support from your provider is key to success.
  • Many students study the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support online. A supportive trainer in conjunction with high-quality learning and assessment resources is the key to your success.
  • The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the main qualification you will need to hold in order to become a teacher's aide in Australia.
  • The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the foundation level education support course – it covers all of the basics of working as a teacher’s aide in mainstream classrooms in Australia.
  • On average, teacher’s aides are paid $30 per hour. Many teacher’s aides are employed 32 hours per week and are therefore earn 32 x 30 = $960 per week plus superannuation and allowances. This includes 11-12 weeks of holidays and very family friendly hours which is a big plus for many people.
  • Don’t discount special needs schools and high schools, both of which offer many employment opportunities.
  • There are no essays or lengthy reports - most of the assessments are made up of short answer questions, case studies and mini projects relevant to your new profession as a teacher’s aide.
  • Ensure that you enrol with a provider who visits you in the workplace as this service is invaluable to your professional development and employment prospects.

What do teacher’s aides do?

work as a teacher aide

Teacher’s aides support students in a range of topics including literacy and numeracy. Pictured: FTTA graduate supporting literacy learning in primary school.


To begin with, we should briefly explain what teacher’s aide do in the real world. You may have read several definitions of what teacher’s aide do, such as on blogs or government websites. However, the research from studies conducted overseas and in Australia, show that teacher’s aide often take on much more complex roles, and interesting, that role seems to be becoming even more complex and demanding. Here is what some recent studies have concluded:


A study in 2015, in Queensland Australia, found that teacher’s aide spend most of their time supporting students one on one or in small groups, as well as a limited amount of non-instructional work.


A New Zealand study concluded that the teacher’s aide role in providing support for students with disabilities in a classroom setting is pivotal in ‘disabled students' educational presence, participation and achievement.


A 2015 study published in the journal The Australian Association for Research in Education, stated that teacher’s aides work:


“with students one on one or in small groups to try to improve their academic outcomes, especially in the core subjects like reading and mathematics. “


a 2018 study conducted in the ACT, stated that teacher’s aides are primarily used to support students with disabilities:


“TAs are now employed to provide learning support in classrooms to enable students with disability and learning difficulties to access learning in mainstream schools… students with disability and learning difficulties are defined as students who receive additional resources to enable them to access classroom support, usually provided by a teacher’s aide.”


Another study from 2011 explained that:


“TAs have inadvertently become the ‘primary mechanism’ enabling students with disability and learning difficulties to attend mainstream schools…”


Howard and Ford (2007), concluded that teacher’s aide support students with more complex tasks such as :


“supporting students with disability and learning difficulties were responsible for planning, producing and adapting materials for one-on-one or small-group activities.”


Teacher’s aides are also known as integration aides, school support officers or SSOs, learning support officers and teacher’s assistants. All of these terms mean the same thing. We use the term teacher’s aide however as it is the most common term used by the general public. Teacher’s aides are found throughout Australia and are in almost every type of school including:

  • Primary schools
  • High schools
  • Special needs schools
  • Kindergartens
  • Alternative schools
  • Religious schools
  • Regional and rural schools
  • Independent schools
  • Specialty programs

In other words, teacher’s aides are involved in almost all facets of school life, including instructional design and delivery, behaviour management, classroom management and resource development.

What modes are available for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

There are three modes available for this course. The first is distance mode – often called online, external etc. This is great for people that are in rural and regional areas, who can’t make it to class or who have other commitments. Online is particularly useful for busy people who need flexible study arrangements.


For example, a student might study the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support for 20 hours one week, but only manage 3 hours the week after. More than half of all students enrol in online mode mainly for the flexibility this mode provides. Importantly, online does not mean that you get less support – in fact the opposite may be true in many respects. Online students are contacted by their trainer (depending on your provider) on a regular basis.

class based teacher aide course

Class based mode is popular and many students enjoy the social aspects. Pictured: FTTA class 2019.


Class based study can mean many things. If you enrol in a teacher’s aide course at TAFE, you may be in class for several days per week. This may not be suitable for everyone but can be fantastic for students who do not have other commitments, such as younger students.


Generally speaking, high school leavers tend to enrol in teacher’s aide courses at TAFE. Mature aged students however, tend to choose private RTOs such as FTTA, where attendance is 1 day per week for class-based enrolments. Classes are beneficial as it provides additional face to face contact, social interactions and the ability to set aside time solely for study and learning.


Finally, there is RPL or Recognition of Prior Learning, for those with considerable experience and are currently employed as a teacher’s aide. This may also be suitable if you have completed older versions of the course or other courses and training, combined with work as a teacher’s aide in Australia.


RPL is almost always for individuals who are employed in a role relevant to the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and have been working at a school for a reasonable period of time – normally 5+ years. An RPL application occurs when the candidate believes that they have skills and knowledge equivalent to the course, due to previous experience and learning. As you have the equivalent skills and knowledge, an RPL program doesn’t take anywhere near as long as the full qualification.

How do I become a teacher’s aide in Australia?

work placement as a teacher adie

To become a teacher’s aide, you will first need to complete a qualification. Pictured: FTTA graduate in a school supporting student learning.

There are several ways that you can become a teacher’s aide in Australia. The most popular pathway for almost all students is to complete the CHC3012 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support. Both of these courses are nationally recognised meaning all schools in Australia accept (and generally require) one or more of these qualifications in order to be employed.


Some people find work as a teacher’s aide without initially completing a qualification, however, that is rare in today’s workplace with the exception of relief work. Schools generally require a nationally recognised qualification such as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support in order to promote a job applicant to the interview stage.


There are several really good reasons for this requirement. Schools need to ensure that the applicants can implement a range of instructional and behavioural strategies to adequately support a range of complex needs. It's also important that the school is comfortable with your understanding of your responsibilities, policies, procedures and concepts such as duty of care and professional judgement. This reduces the risk of something happening that could endanger students or staff. It also ensures that schools hire the best person for the job, maximising student learning and minimising behavioural issues.


Some research has shown that untrained teacher’s aides can actually have a negative impact on student learning and development. There are several reasons for this including students receiving less instructional time from the teacher. Hence schools tend to prefer well-trained teacher’s aides.


For this reason, we highly recommend that you enrol in a nationally recognised qualification if you're thinking about working as a teacher’s aide in an Australian school.

What does ‘online study’ mean as far as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support?

It’s important to bear in mind that ‘online’ is a broad term that can mean many different things, especially in terms of studying an online teacher’s aide course in Australia. It often doesn’t mean that you will sit in front of a computer for months on end without verbal or face to face contact with another human being.


Studying online simply means that students access a range of resources via a student portal (often called a Learning Management System). In addition, good providers will offer various services and resources as part of their program such as:

  • Interactive webinars where students can ask questions and speak with each other
  • Face to face tutorials or workshops in small groups (1-2 hours and up to a full day)
  • Regular phone and email contact from the trainer
  • Short courses relevant to the course
  • Interactive online activities

Also, don’t forget about the placement which is certainly NOT an online activity. Your work placement is completed in a local school and is a mandatory part of the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support.

Is studying the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support online difficult?

For the majority of students, studying the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support online is perfectly fine, provided the student has access to a supportive trainer and high-quality resources (such as webinars and learner guides written by their trainers), which are practical and easy to use.


It depends on your provider and on the individual student. For some students, studying online is much harder but it may be the only option, due to time issues and other commitments. Other students find studying online easy and enjoy the flexibility of not having to sacrifice family time, work commitments and income, in order to be in class.


In many cases, ‘harder’ is probably not quite the correct description – online can however be ‘longer’ in some cases. One reason is that students who attend classes can ask questions if they are confused or frustrated, and tend to be more motivated due to the structure and expectations of submission dates set down by the class trainer. Distance or online students have more flexibility and tend to study at a self-determined pace (with trainer support of course).

Is the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support the best way to become a teacher's aide?

getting starting in education support

Many students find work where they complete their work placement for the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. Pictured: FTTA student successfully completes her placement.


The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the main qualification that you will need to hold in order to become a teacher's aide in Australia. You could also consider completing the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support or the teacher’s aide combo which is very popular.


Effectively, the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the minimum qualification to become a teacher’s aide in Australian schools - in all states and territories. It’s a nationally recognised qualification, meaning it is recognised by all schools in Australia. Schools will expect that you hold this qualification if applying for work as a teacher’s aide. Many teacher’s aide job advertisements require the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support.


There are other avenues to becoming a teacher's aide. This may include for example, having a relevant degree from a foreign institution. However, even students in this scenario quite often find it easier to complete either the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support before or while applying for work in a school.


This makes it easier because many schools still require a nationally recognised teacher’s aide qualification. Having a qualification satisfies hiring managers that the person they hire has sufficient skills in key areas such as in safety, duty of care, behaviour management, support strategies and so forth.

What is the difference between the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support and the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support?

integration aide training

Teacher’s aides work in a range of contexts depending on the needs of the school and the students.


The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support is the foundation level education support course. In this course you will cover all of the topics that are required in order to work as a teacher’s aide in the mainstream classroom environment. All teacher’s aides work at some point with students with disabilities, difficulties or disorders. The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support, however, is the specialist qualification for those wishing to work with students with more complex and challenging disabilities, difficulties, disorders, and additional needs.


Many students begin their career by enrolling in the higher-level qualification without completing the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support. Whether you can do this depends on your provider, the courses available in your area, and which mode you choose to study.


You could also consider enrolling in the teacher’s aide combo (as we call it at FTTA). The teacher's aide combo is a dual qualification program, where you complete both courses at the same time in one streamlined program. It's a little bit more expensive and it takes a little longer, however, we think it's definitely worth it. This program is easier and cheaper than enrolling and completing two courses separately.


Are there other differences between the two courses? Is one harder than the other? The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support requires a higher level of skills and knowledge - simply because it’s a higher-level course. But is there a big difference in terms of difficulty? Probably not. If you were to compare an assessment from one course to the assessment of another, students probably couldn’t tell the difference. In fact, the average trainer probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference.


The CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support might be a little bit more difficult for students who struggle with English, and in particular, ESL students (English as a Second Language). Many ESL students have no issues with this course. However, if you are new to learning English, you may be advised to consider an English course or a lower level qualification first. If this is you, we recommend speaking with us for advice relevant to your situation.

How much do teacher’s aides get paid/earn per week & hour?

On average teacher’s aides are paid $30 per hour. Many teacher’s aides work 32 hours per week, so therefore they are paid 32 x 30 = $960 per week plus superannuation. This includes 11-12 weeks of holidays and very family friendly hours which is a big plus for many people.


This estimate is higher than most other websites. Why? We train thousands of teacher’s aides and have done so for a very long time – and where do most of them get work? With special needs students. This means they are typically employed on higher salaries around the $30 per hour rate. A very large percentage of teacher’s aides work with special needs – probably the majority. And there are a lot of them - some special needs schools have many times more teacher’s aides than teachers.


Working as a teacher’s aide is probably the only government job where you work 8:30-3:00 (or similar) and get a bunch of holidays while NEVER working public holidays. While most work about 32 hours per week, a small number of teacher’s aides are employed for 38 hours per week and are therefore required to stay at school between 8 am and 4 pm.


However, it is important to remember that $30 per hour is an average and you may earn anywhere between $25 and $35 depending on a range of factors:

  • What job you do (special needs, mainstream, AIEO, home economics)
  • Whether you are in private or public schools
  • Which state you are employed in (WA for example is different to QLD)
  • Whether you work in a metro, regional or rural school
  • Experience and qualifications that you hold

Also note that all teacher’s aides accrue annual leave, personal leave and long service leave – except of course, casual staff (often called relief), who earn an hourly or day rate plus a casual loading, normally 25%.

Is it easy to find a teacher’s aide job in Australia?

learning support officer course

Relief work is covering for a teacher’s aide who is absent – a great way to get your foot in the door.


Finding a teacher’s aide job in Australia is relatively easy in terms of casual, part time or relief work. One reason for this is the sheer number of opportunities available in most states. In WA for example, there are over 1000 schools. Large numbers of teacher’s aides are employed in almost every school. It is not uncommon for example, to see a special needs school (quite often called education support centres in WA), with 60 staff – the majority of whom are teacher’s aides. Most teacher’s aides work part time – the average is 3 days per week.


However, if you are hoping to work in a particular school, it may be some time before a position becomes available unless you are really lucky. Even then, there may be competition from existing staff.


You may need to broaden your horizons and seek employment in a range of schools in your local area. Don’t discount special needs schools, high schools and schools that are further away than you would have liked. Early in your career, it is important to get as much experience as possible. You can continue to look for work in your preferred area, while working in other locations temporarily.


Many students discount high schools as an option. However, for those willing to give it a go, they often find it very enjoyable. It is often easier to find work in high schools and senior schools or colleges. Remember that most staff with contracts and permanent positions engage in relief work first – sometimes for 6-12 months. Once schools feel comfortable with you, contract will suddenly appear!


Other factors that may influence your success at finding work include:

  • The time of the year (you won’t find work as a teacher’s aide in December. February is a good time to look for work however.)
  • Your demeanour and approach – professionalism and rapport
  • Your skills and knowledge
  • How you manage change, deal with stress and interact with staff
  • Whether you have a nationally recognised qualification from a reputable provider

Obtaining a nationally recognised qualification such as the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support or the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support is essential to becoming a teacher’s aide in Australia.


Gone are the days when the average parent helper can become a teacher’s aide in a school – the so called ‘mums’ brigade.’ Schools have long realised that well-trained teacher’s aides are much more effective than those with no formal training - even if they are great with kids and have lots of parenting experience. During your nationally recognised qualification you will learn a range of strategies and techniques that are essential for working as a teacher’s aide in the modern Australian school system.


Positions are sometimes advertised online or on the jobs’ board of the department’s (of education) website. Often hundreds of people apply for these positions depending on the role and location. For this reason, we generally don’t recommend that you hinge your job-hunting success on applying for advertised positions.


You may also find that some positions are advertised in the local and state newspaper. This is mainly the case for part-time and temporary positions in the private sector such as at Catholic schools.


We recommend the following steps in order to find a teacher’s aide job:

  • Complete a course with a reputable provider
  • Prepare your resume and clearances (WWCC or Blue Card)
  • Approach 20-30 schools in your local area and don’t be too fussy
  • Ask to be placed on the relief list and to be considered for any contracts
  • Undertake as much short-term work and relief work as is available
  • Wait for a contract, full-time position or more permanent position to become available - which it will eventually, if you work hard.

This is the tried and tested method that we teach our students, and is based on advice from schools, teachers, and those involved in interviewing and hiring teacher’s aides in Australian schools.

Tell me about FTTA’s teacher’s aide courses specifically the CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support.

integration aide online

FTTA students tend to be adult learners with an average age of 37.


The CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support has several components. Firstly, there is the theoretical (what we call the theory part) of your course. The theory part of your course involves a range of learning activities culminating in an assessment. These activities include:

  • Reading through the learner guide and associated activities
  • Attending online webinars whether live or pre-recorded
  • Additional readings found in your portal
  • Class lectures and videos

There are no essays or lengthy reports and most of the assessments are made up of short answer questions, case studies and mini projects relevant to your work as a teacher’s aide. We try to keep things as practical and as relevant as possible to your chosen profession.


Another aspect of your course is your work placement. Your work placement is completed at a local school where you will complete a range of activities culminating in a workplace assessment. Your workplace assessment includes a visit by your trainer who will observe you undertaking a range of common (day to day) tasks.


Ensure that you enrol with a provider who visits you in the workplace. It may be the last opportunity you have for a trainer observe you in the workplace and provide a series of recommendations on how you can improve. This can have a big impact on your professional development and hence the chances of finding stable and permanent work in your chosen area. It’s also an important service in the event that there are issues during your placement. Even the best student can have issues from time to time.


Another aspect of your course that we are yet to discuss is classes. Classes are held one day per week which is more than do-able for even the busiest of people. Classes are great for students who live within driving distance of the venue. We highly recommend classes if you can make it. Some online students attend classes now and then as well as tutorials. You can also attend live online webinars which are held on a weekly basis on specific topics relevant to your course. Your trainer can also be contacted as needed by phone, in person or by email.

Summary

By reading these questions and answers, you may have discovered some of the opportunities available to those seeking a new and exciting career as a teacher’s aide or teacher’s assistant. To begin with however, a few challenges lay in your way – where to study? What to study? What mode to choose? We have tried to answer some of these questions, as well as many of the common enquiries that we receive on a regular basis - pay, allowances, holidays, courses, modes, support, difficulty etc. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to contact one of our student advisers.

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STUDY BY DISTANCE MODE

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STUDY BY CLASS MODE

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TEACHER'S AIDE GUIDE

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Distance

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Many students prefer to study their course without coming into class on a regular basis. This is commonly referred to as distance learning but can also be called external, online, blended or flexible learning. These terms are very similar and generally mean that:

  • There is little or no attendance on campus
  • Most learning materials are accessed through a website portal
  • Students will often have hardcopy materials as well
  • Students will still have access to support via email and phone
  • Many students still attend tutorials for additional assistance

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. There are many reasons why students choose to study by distance:

  • Classes are not held in the local area
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning classes cover existing knowledge
  • Alternative study programs or pathways
  • Regular travel or hospital stays
  • Existing worker completing a traineeships or RPL

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are not attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Online learning is becoming more and more popular each year and many courses now enrol more online students than class based students.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at ftta.com.au

Class Based Learning

Class based learning is a popular study mode and is great for students who have not studied for a long period of time, who live closer to the training location or who simply enjoy being in class. We always recommend enrolling in a class based mode where possible as students who attend classes are typically more successful.

In today’s busy and demanding world, adult learners are looking for more flexible ways to gain qualifications, increase their job prospects and improve their earning potential. Gone are the days where students can afford to spend 20 or 30 hours per week in a classroom. Advances in technology now allows students to access high quality and engaging resources in their own home.

Flexible learning (also called blended learning) is a combination of class and distance and is where a student attends some online learning and some class based learning. Class based learning with FTTA involves the following:

  • Attend class one day per week over a period of time
  • Complete set homework activities and assessments between classes
  • Attend tutorial as needed and recommended by your trainer
  • Complete the workplace learning component
  • Regularly accessing resources and learning materials in the online portal
  • Regular contact with trainers via email, phone, individual meetings/tutorials or during class

Students tell us that they enjoy being in class for two main reasons:
Firstly, because they can easily ask questions and trainers can help students when stuck. Note that many courses have online lectures (recorded in class) for distance students.

Secondly, students enjoy the social aspect of class based learning: swapping stories, talking about the course and helping each other along the way. Many students make new friends and study together outside of class time.

There are many reasons why students choose a flexible class based study mode:

  • Attending full time is not possible
  • Work commitments
  • Family commitments
  • Health reasons
  • A want of more flexible study times
  • Time poor for various reasons
  • Previous experience meaning extensive class time is not an efficient use of time
  • Enrolled in other education programs
  • Regular travel or hospital stays

Many courses have a work placement requirement such as aged care and child care regardless of which mode of study selected however this is usually completed in the local area.

Even though students are attending classes, they are still able to access support services including:

  • Email and phone support
  • Booking one on one tutoring
  • Attending regularly held workshops
  • Attending some classes (subject to available places)
  • Orientation and engagement sessions early and throughout the course

The online portal is a structured learning pathway. This means that students work though activities and assessments in a structured manner as directed by their trainer. This structure is easy to follow and explained step by step. Each topic has instructions on how to complete that particular topic. Resources in the portal generally include:

  • Learner guides for each topic
  • Power point presentations
  • Links to YouTube videos and websites
  • Additional readings
  • Toolboxes with videos and a range of activities
  • Practice activities
  • Free short courses such as work skills, literacy skills and Microsoft Office
  • Assessments and assessment tips and guides
  • Lectures from your trainers

Flexible learning is becoming more and more popular as people become busier.

If you would like more information please speak to one of our student advisors or you can enrol using our online enrolment form at ftta.com.au

Education Support - A Guide

Education Assistants work in schools such as kindergartens, primary schools, high schools and special needs centres.

Education Assistants work under the guidance and instruction of teachers. They can work with a single student for most of the day or float in a class or a number of classes helping many different students.

Education Assistants or EAs for short can also be called integration aides, teacher aides, support workers, teacher assistants, Aboriginal and Indigenous Education Officers or AIEOs, Home Economic Assistants, or school support officers.

Some of the main tasks of an EA includes:

  • Helping individual students with activities and learning
  • Helping small groups of students with activities and learning
  • Helping students with core skills such as reading, writing and numeracy
  • Helping students who have learning difficulties, a disability or a disorder
  • Helping the teacher with behaviour management, ensuring that students are on task
  • Helping the teacher with activities such as cleaning and preparing resources
  • Ensuring that students are safe at all times

Education Assistants are most often employed to work with students who need additional support in learning or due to a disability or behavioural issues.

EAs may also work in specialist positions such as in literacy programs or youth at risk programs.

To obtain work as an EA you will need to have the following:

  • A Working with Children Check
  • Usually a police clearance is also required
  • A relevant qualification such as the Certificate III in Disability or Certificate III in Education Support
  • A suitable demeanour, attitude and presentation to work in a school environment
  • A love of working with children and other people in a team environment
  • A good quality resume and cover letter

Education Assistants undertake many community service work tasks including but not limited to:

  • Working with parents and guardians on a daily basis
  • Assisting with case management (IEPs and IBPs)
  • Organising community events such as excursions and fetes
  • Assisting vulnerable groups of people such as low-socio economic
  • Ensuring abuse and neglect is reported to supervisors
  • Obtaining funding such as grants from government departments or local businesses
  • Organising and assisting with events such as art displays
  • Working with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Assisting with a range of disabilities and disorders
  • Researching and informing clients of support services and networks
  • Liaising with community groups
  • Liaising with specialist case workers such as psychologists and teachers
  • Managing behaviour and learning
  • Planning activities and creating resources

Education assistants often work with children with disabilities including but not limited to:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Dyslexia
  • Processing disorders
  • Developmental delay disorders
  • Foetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Oppositional Defiance Disorder
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Mental health
  • Fragile X
  • Downs Syndrome

It is generally easy to find casual and part time work as an education assistant by putting your name down at all schools in your local area. This often leads to more permanent employment. Many education assistants work part time.

When looking for work, don’t forget special needs schools which are schools within the main school that even have their own Principal, teachers and administration staff. Over 90% of people who enrol in a course to become an education assistant are female and are often mothers who are looking for family friendly work hours.

Depending on the course and level, education assistants learn the following:

  • Safety including duty of care laws
  • Education policy and regulations
  • Supporting students literacy and numeracy learning
  • Instructional techniques (how to help students learn)
  • Techniques for working with a diverse range of people
  • Behaviour management techniques
  • Developmental domains such as cognitive, language and social development
  • Basics of and techniques for working with specific disabilities and disorders
  • Creating activities and basic planning
  • Working with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individual Behaviour Plans (IBPs)
  • Early Years Learning Framework implementation

Working in the education sector is challenging, rewarding and is a never ending learning curve. Rarely will you be bored working as an education assistant as each day presents a new challenge.

If you would like more information, please speak to one of our student advisors.

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OUR TEACHER'S AIDE COURSES

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support & CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

TEACHER'S AIDE COURSE

CHC30213 Certificate III in Education Support

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TEACHER'S AIDE COURSE

CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support

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FROM OUR STUDENTS

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Thanks to my trainer and FTTA, I know made the right decision to change my career.

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ABOUT US

With more than 4000 graduates, FTTA is the go-to provider for teacher's aide courses. 1 in 2 students choose to study the CHC40213 Certificate IV in Education Support with FTTA.

              

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